Java Zen:Thinking Out Loud Friday, 2017.12.15
Far more crucial than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to
know.

		Eric Hoffer

2006.06.21

Reflections On Guns and Freedom

I came across this post, Guns and Freedom, by Bill Whittle from December 17, 2002.

When I was a little kid, I asked my dad (who had served in the latter days of WW2 in Europe as a U.S. Army intelligence officer) about images I had seen of really huge numbers of prisoners being marched to their execution, guarded by perhaps five or ten men with rifles. I wanted to know why they didn’t just rush the guards? I mean, it’s one thing if they were heading to another crappy day at work camp, but these people were being marched off to be killed. I mean, for God’s sake, what did they have to lose?

I was six. My dad looked at me. He’d been to the camps, seen some horrible things. When I asked him why they didn’t fight back or run for the woods, he said, without any arrogance or pride or jingoism, “I don’t know Billy, I can’t figure that one out myself.” Then there was a long moment. “But I can’t imagine Americans just walking off like that, either.”

United Airlines flight 93 is a sobering validation to the impression Bill Whittle’s father has of Americans. In the span of a mere 28 minutes unsuspecting and unprepared American citizens figured out they were under attack, planned and executed a counter attack and in doing so prevented the terrorists from hitting their intended target of either the White House or the United States Capitol.